Since its launch in February 2004, Facebook has become one of the most popular websites in the world, as well as a widely discussed media phenomenon. Unsurpris- ingly, the Facebook revolution has inspired a wealth of psychological study, which is growing exponentially. In this article, we review the recent empirical research into some of the key psychological themes concerning Facebook use. The review is organized according to common questions about Facebook culture and use being posed by academics and social commentators alike. These questions are grouped under three major themes, namely: (a) antecedents of Facebook use; (b) how individuals and corporations use Facebook; and (c) psychological outcomes or effects of Facebook use. To this end, we review over 100 recent publications (mostly empirical, peer-reviewed journal articles). We conclude by providing some suggestions for future psychological research in this rapidly expanding area of popular media culture.

Read full paper here: Facebook Psychology

Lifestyle app LIVR provides users a revolutionary social experience built around casual drinking and access to a global, online party accessible only by blowing into a plug-in breathalyzer.

Learn more here: LIVR

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You’ve reached the top of the world? With BucketListly, we’ve made it super easy for you to share your greatest moments of your life with your friends. Simply snap a photo, tag location, choose where to share and unlock it. Your achievement will be shared automatically to your specified social networks.

Learn more here: BucketListly

Twitch Plays Pokémon is a “social experiment” and channel on the video streaming website Twitch, consisting of a crowdsourced attempt to play Game Freak’s and Nintendo’s Pokémon video games by parsing commands sent by users through the channel’s chat room. The game has become well known for trolling and anti-trolling warfare because of the constant button mashing.
The concept was developed by an anonymous Australian programmer and launched on 12 February 2014, starting with the game Pokémon Red. The stream became unexpectedly popular, reaching an average concurrent viewership of over 80,000 viewers (with at least 10% participating). On 1 March 2014, the game was completed after more than 16 continuous days of gameplay; Twitch estimated that over 1.16 million people participated, with peak simultaneous participation at 121,000, and with a total of 36 million views during the experiment.

Play along here: Twitchplayspokemon

The Bartle Test of Gamer Psychology is a series of questions and an accompanying scoring formula that classifies players of multiplayer online games (including MUDs and MMORPGs) into categories based on their gaming preferences. The test is based on a 1996 paper by Richard Bartle and was created in 1999–2000 by Erwin Andreasen and Brandon Downey. Although the test has met with some criticism for the dichotomous nature of its question-asking method, the test has been taken by a large number of computer game players. As of October 2011, the test had been taken over 800,000 times.

Learn more here: Bartle Test

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