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Social Media

Since its launch in February 2004, Facebook has become one of the most popular websites in the world, as well as a widely discussed media phenomenon. Unsurpris- ingly, the Facebook revolution has inspired a wealth of psychological study, which is growing exponentially. In this article, we review the recent empirical research into some of the key psychological themes concerning Facebook use. The review is organized according to common questions about Facebook culture and use being posed by academics and social commentators alike. These questions are grouped under three major themes, namely: (a) antecedents of Facebook use; (b) how individuals and corporations use Facebook; and (c) psychological outcomes or effects of Facebook use. To this end, we review over 100 recent publications (mostly empirical, peer-reviewed journal articles). We conclude by providing some suggestions for future psychological research in this rapidly expanding area of popular media culture.

Read full paper here: Facebook Psychology

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Like any other map, The Internet map is a scheme displaying objects’ relative position; but unlike real maps (e.g. the map of the Earth) or virtual maps (e.g. the map of Mordor), the objects shown on it are not aligned on a surface. Mathematically speaking, The Internet map is a bi-dimensional presentation of links between websites on the Internet. Every site is a circle on the map, and its size is determined by website traffic, the larger the amount of traffic, the bigger the circle. Users’ switching between websites forms links, and the stronger the link, the closer the websites tend to arrange themselves to each other.

See the map here: The Internet Map

Did you know that recent studies have shown that 50 percent of people hear about breaking news on social media?

What if I told you that two-thirds of law enforcement agencies believe that social media helps them solve crimes more quickly, that 80 percent of U.S. college and university faculties now use social media and that 1 in 6 job-seekers credit social media with helping them find a job?

Social media has revolutionised many industries, and it’s leading to big business: as much as $1.3 trillion is expected to be added to the U.S. economy through the added productivity and improved customer service that social media provides.

Check out the info graphic here: INFOGRAPHIC

Social networking sites like Facebook and MySpace allow you to find and connect with just about anyone, from a coworker in a neighboring cube to the girl who played Emily in your high school production of “Our Town” thirty years ago. Browsing these sites can make you feel connected to a larger community, but such easy, casual connection in an electronic environment can also have its downside.

Read the article here: The Negative Effect of Social Media on Society and Individuals